How to Set Up a Music Game Meeting

Holding a music game meeting is as easy or complex as you make it. You can think of it as a casual get together with friends or a huge public workshop and performance. Either way, you want it to go as smoothly as possible. Here is a list of things to think about when setting up such gatherings. It will continue to be updated.

1. Teach by giving a demonstration rather than explaining every rule step by step.
2. If you can, have the game rules available to all the players involved at least a few days before playing the game(s). Hand them out, email them, or insert them on any the web page for your gathering.
3. Always bring more than you need. Prepare more games than you expect to play - all of the various degrees of ability. That way you can adjust the levels if needed.
4. Involve the players as you teach the rules - keep them immersed in the explanation of the rules.
5. Always ask if there are any questions after demonstrating/teaching the rules of a music game.
6. Have as many instruments/objects available for others to use as you can.
7. Work on your public speaking skills!
8. Plan the music game 'set list' accordingly. With a good amount of variation. Sometimes it's fun to have a theme.
9. Don't forget to have break time!
10. Many rules require that all players be able to see each other. Try to have everyone in a circle or semicircle. Semicircles are best if there is an audience and/or dedicated conductor.

Ideas on where to hold a music game meeting:

1. A house
2. Rent a practice studio - they are usually very cheap and come equipped.
3. Community Center
4. recreation center
5. A bar that rents out music spaces/stages
6. A school/university hall
7. Some churches allow various gatherings
8. A public park

Also, check out this video on how to set up local music gatherings:

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